Electro CD

A style that began as an early form of hip-hop, Electro has grown to encompass anything that uses the classic, electronic, syncopated beat found on tracks like “Planet Rock” by Afrika Bambaataa or “White Lines” by Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five, or as popularized by Herbie Hancock’s “RockIt”. Electro is also applied retroactively to some of the music of Kraftwerk, particularly “Numbers” and “Home Computer”—forward-looking, danceable electronic tracks which were highly regarded in early hip-hop culture.

Aside from the distinctive rhythm pattern, Electro is often distinguished by an emphasis on synthesizers, vocoders, and dry, syncopated/”funky” drum sounds (as opposed to the monotonous, low-pitch bass drum of house and techno). In contrast to typical hip-hop approach of mining funky beats and warm basslines from old vinyl and emphasizing a rap vocal, the Electro vibe is more about producing new, cold, heavily synthetic-sounding beats and minimal basslines, with chanted vocals, extended instrumental passages, and minor-key lead synth themes.

The funky side of Electro can include sung vocals, is also known as Electro-Funk, and was a basis of the freestyle genre (initially “Latin hip-hop”). The Techno side of Electro is rooted in the music of Cybotron and Model 500, and was defined more fully in the ’90s by artists such as Drexciya and Anthony Rother. The term or prefix Electro is also applied to synth-pop and industrial dance music with little or no hip-hop connection, but which just incorporated similarly styled beat patterns, instrumentation, and overall feel.

Showing all 40 results

Showing all 40 results